Vintage Goodyear sign, cast iron Goodyear sign, Car sign, collectible sign, Goodyear Founded 1898

DSG Antiques

  • $69.00


Check out this classic history rich Goodyear sign. Made of solid cast iron and hand-painted it's built to last the ages. There's a "Founded 1898" stamp on the back that's engraved during the original sign making process.  With stunning colors and raised embossed letter this Goodyear sign just pops. It appeals to collectors but also fits any car history or automotive buff. Great gift or a really cool sign to add to your collection.

The size for this Goodyear diamond sign is:

15.5" Wide by 7" High by .5" deep

This Goodyear sign weighs in at a solid:

4lbs 4ozs

Early history 1898–1926[edit]

A little Goodyear Wiki backstory:

The first Goodyear factory opened in Akron, Ohio, in 1898. The thirteen original employees manufactured bicycle and carriagetires, rubber horseshoe pads, and poker chips. The company grew with the advent of the automobile.

In 1901 Frank Seiberling provided Henry Ford with racing tires. In 1903, Paul Weeks Litchfield was granted a patent for the first tubeless automobile tire. By 1908 Ford was outfitting his Model T with Goodyear tires. In 1909 Goodyear manufactured its first aircraft tire.[7]

In 1911 Goodyear started experimenting with airship design. It later manufactured airships and observation balloons for the United States Army Air Service during World War I. The transport and reconnaissance capabilities that Goodyear provided contributed significantly to the Allied victory.[citation needed]

In 1916, Litchfield found land in the Phoenix area suitable for growing long-staple cotton, needed for reinforcing rubber in tires. The 36,000 acres purchased were controlled by the Southwest Cotton Company, formed with Litchfield as president. (This included land that would develop into the towns of Goodyear and Litchfield Park.)

In 1924, Litchfield, as Goodyear Vice President, forged a joint venture with the German Luftschiffbau Zeppelin Company to form the Goodyear-Zeppelin Corporation.

By 1926 Goodyear was the largest rubber company in the world. Only four years earlier it was forced to temporarily halt production of racing tires due to heavy competition. Nevertheless, the popularity of the Goodyear tire on the racing circuit led to a popular demand for the return of the brand.